September 22, 2014
"To borrow a metaphor from the fossil-fuel age, our job is to inject pressure into the system. Marches aren’t subtle; they don’t lay out detailed manifestos. Movements work by making the status quo impossibly uncomfortable—by deploying people, arguments, metaphors, and images until our leaders have no choice but to change and, in so doing, release some of that pressure."

Bill McKibben, one of the lead organizers of the People’s Climate March, reflects on Sunday’s turnout. (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

September 22, 2014

thepeoplesrecord:

300,000+ people from all over the world marched for climate justice yesterday afternoon in New York City ahead of the United Nations Climate Summit happening this week. 

Although the march’s organization & some participating groups were problematic, the sheer number of people who flooded Manhattan yesterday was unreal. We can use these gatherings to support each other’s organizing work, connect our struggles, share stories & strategize our next moves. 

Flood Wall Street direct actions & civil disobedience to call out climate change profiteers are happening right now at Battery Park. Updates coming soon.

All photos by the awesome Jenna Pope

September 22, 2014
The Revolution Against Campus Sexual Assault

(Source: humanrightswatch)

September 21, 2014

guardian:

Americans often risk arrests to protest for a range of causes – from climate change to better wages. The arrests, however, might cost them.

"Look at Ferguson. Look at all of the arrests that have happened. All of these individuals who might have a record that they might not even realize that in six months, or several years down the road, will follow them and could cause them to lose a job.”

Full story »

Photo: Jake May/AP

(Source: theguardian.com)

September 19, 2014
newyorker:

Three years after the Occupy movement’s first protests, the Rolling Jubilee initiative has proven to have some staying power. Vauhini Vara reports on the group’s latest move to cancel private debt.
Photograph by Nina Berman/Noor

newyorker:

Three years after the Occupy movement’s first protests, the Rolling Jubilee initiative has proven to have some staying power. Vauhini Vara reports on the group’s latest move to cancel private debt.

Photograph by Nina Berman/Noor

September 17, 2014
npr:

It was an ordinary Friday. Courtney Brown, 24, of Kalamazoo, Mich., was busy looking for a job. “I’ve applied all kinds of places,” she says. “Wal-Mart, Target, Verizon Wireless.”
Then she got a strange letter in the mail. “‘We are writing you with good news,’” she reads to me over the phone. “‘We got rid of some of your Everest College debt … no one should be forced to mortgage their future for an education.’”
The letter went on to say that her private student loan from a for-profit college, in the amount of $790.05, had just been forgiven outright by something called the Rolling Jubilee.
Since November 2012, Rolling Jubilee has purchased and eradicated about $15 million worth of debt arising from unpaid medical bills. Today, the group announced that it has erased $3.9 million in private student loans, including Courtney Brown’s and almost 3,000 other students of the for-profit Everest College.
These People Can Make Student Loans Disappear
Illustration credit: LA Johnson/NPR

npr:

It was an ordinary Friday. Courtney Brown, 24, of Kalamazoo, Mich., was busy looking for a job. “I’ve applied all kinds of places,” she says. “Wal-Mart, Target, Verizon Wireless.”

Then she got a strange letter in the mail. “‘We are writing you with good news,’” she reads to me over the phone. “‘We got rid of some of your Everest College debt … no one should be forced to mortgage their future for an education.’”

The letter went on to say that her private student loan from a for-profit college, in the amount of $790.05, had just been forgiven outright by something called the Rolling Jubilee.

Since November 2012, Rolling Jubilee has purchased and eradicated about $15 million worth of debt arising from unpaid medical bills. Today, the group announced that it has erased $3.9 million in private student loans, including Courtney Brown’s and almost 3,000 other students of the for-profit Everest College.

These People Can Make Student Loans Disappear

Illustration credit: LA Johnson/NPR

September 16, 2014

(Source: wildvampirequeen, via astranemus)